Syria


About 400,000 dead, about 12 million displaced. These are some of the numbers of the Syrian war, which began in the spring of 2011 and has not yet ended. The Syrian revolution, which began like many other revolts in the Arab squares against totalitarian regimes for the demand for more political and civil rights, quickly turned into one of the bloodiest conflicts of the last thirty years. A battlefield with an infinite number of actors involved, the best known perhaps ISIS, which saw its birth and strengthening in the Syrian conflict. Syria has represented and represents the playing field for international interests, the chessboard where the games of force and international alliances are weighed. And where, as in all conflicts, these power games see the civilian population as the first victim.

About 400,000 dead, about 12 million displaced. These are some of the numbers of the Syrian war, which began in the spring of 2011 and has not yet ended. The Syrian revolution, which began like many other revolts in the Arab squares against totalitarian regimes for the demand for more political and civil rights, quickly turned into one of the bloodiest conflicts of the last thirty years. A battlefield with an infinite number of actors involved, the best known perhaps ISIS, which saw its birth and strengthening in the Syrian conflict. Syria has represented and represents the playing field for international interests, the chessboard where the games of force and international alliances are weighed. And where, as in all conflicts, these power games see the civilian population as the first victim.